Child and teen wellness practice opens in Cedar Fairmount

Child and teen wellness practice opens in Cedar Fairmount

Richard Dempsey

Richard Dempsey, a licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) has opened a child and adolescent psychotherapy practice in the Cedar Fairmount Business District.

Fairmount Mental Wellness, located in the Heights Medical Building (2460 Fairmount Blvd., Suite 317), serves the social and emotional needs of children and their families.

Specializing in narrative therapy, Dempsey’s focus is on helping angry kids, frustrated parents and disconnected families, and addressing concerns related to behavior, anxiety and depression.

“Narrative therapy proposes that people use certain stories about themselves like the lens on a camera,” explained Dempsey. “These stories have the effect of filtering a person’s experience of life and thereby selecting what information gets focused in or focused out. These stories shape a person’s perspectives on their lives, histories and futures. Despite information to the contrary, these stories of identity can be remarkably stable. Narrative therapy provides a means to refocus the lens and help reshape a person’s stories and life. In this way I help children, teens and families turn old stories into new ones.”

“In the face of serious problems it’s hard to believe that conversations can shape new realities,” said Dempsey. “But they do.”

Dempsey has more than 14 years of experience in the mental health field, including stints with Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Washington’s Department of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy, Bellefaire Jewish Children’s Bureau and private counseling practice. He is a specialist in working with K–12 school-aged children.

Dempsey attended graduate school at The Seattle School of Theology and Psychology, where he studied counseling psychology and Christian theology. His practice is informed by both psychological and theological assumptions about the world. 

In 2014 he returned home to Cleveland and started work at Bellefaire. Today he is a school-based counselor in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, where his focus has been on classroom behavior and academic achievement to support the social and emotional health of students in Cleveland’s elementary and middle schools.

For additional information, or to schedule an appointment, visit www.fairmountmw.com or call 216-714-2910.

Kaye Lowe: 18 years building Cedar Fairmount

Kaye Lowe: 18 years building Cedar Fairmount

by Shari Nacson

Kaye Lowe will retire this month as executive director of the Cedar Fairmount Special Improvement District, after 18 years at the organization and its predecessor.

If you’ve enjoyed the landscaping, community art and ambiance of Cedar Fairmount, you’ve appreciated the work of Kaye Lowe, who’s dedicated the last 18 years of her professional life to building the “Gateway to the Heights.”

In May 2000, Lowe became executive director of the Cedar Fairmount Business Association. With a small, dues-based budget, Lowe undertook the coalition-building work that would evolve, nine years later, into the Cedar Fairmount Special Improvement District (CFSID). According to CFSID President Sal Russo, Lowe “has been the heart and soul” of the operation. Through Lowe’s work, the neighborhood has been characterized by stable businesses, signature landscaping, and community art.

The nonprofit CFSID comprises 11 non-residential property owners who choose to pay an additional property tax into a shared budget with the goal of strengthening the district. Under the leadership of a board of trustees, the CFSID has hosted fundraisers, won grants, and sought additional funds from property owners and neighbors to finance special projects.

Lowe has loved being at the hub of this interface. She said it is impactful, inspiring and heartening. “It has been such a pleasure to work with property owners who care so much about Cedar Fairmount and who want to continue to see it grow and maintain its viability,” she said, as she prepared for her final weeks on the job.

Early in her tenure, Lowe worked to establish the Friends of Cedar Fairmounta 150-member citizen group that worked with the district and its trustees to study and improve the streetscape. Lowe said this was one of her most gratifying projects. The collaboration resulted in the distinctive Cedar Fairmount logo street signs and a 2017 streetscape overhaul that’s nearing completion.

Lowe views it all through an historical lens. “When I started out, there was no FutureHeights and no Heights Arts. I’ve watched both organizations grow,” she said. Lowe also reflected on Cedar Fairmount’s stability. Several retail and professional spaces have been in the district for more than 40 years, and Lowe noted, “The longevity of the businesses and professionals is a tribute to the property owners who care.”

Brendan Ring, owner of Nighttown and treasurer of CFSID, has worked with Lowe since the beginning. “She has been tenacious,” said Ring, who called Lowe the backbone of the day-to-day operations. While these seem like “big shoes to fill,” Ring said CFSID will continue to thrive under new leadership. He said applications for a new director are under review, and district leadership hopes to have a replacement by the time Lowe retires in January. 

Lowe plans to be available to train her successor. After that, she looks forward to enjoying her retirement by spending more time with her husband and volunteering with organizations like the Blossom Friends of the Cleveland Orchestra. 

A gathering to honor Lowe’s tenure as executive director of CFSID will take place on Jan. 16, at 6:30 p.m., at Nighttown.

Anyone who has interacted with Lowe over the years is welcome to attend. The first drink and light appetizers will be courtesy of CFSID. To attend, RSVP to nighttowncleveland@gmail.com.

Shari Nacson

Mostly a mom, Shari Nacson, is a freelance editor, social worker, and nonprofit consultant who makes her home in Cleveland Heights. More than anything, Nacson is inspired by kids and adults who build connection through kindness.

Nightown Home for the Holiday’s Series Continues!

Nightown Home for the Holiday’s Series Continues!

Tonight (Thursday), its the Cliff Habian Trio.  Cliff is one of the legends of piano in the NE Ohio scene.  He’ll be joined by Kip Reed on bass and Bill Ransom on drums.

ImageOn Friday, it’s the great jazz singer Vanessa Rubin, back in Cleveland to sing for you.  Vanessa has recorded for RCA and Telarc.  Always a great show!!

On Saturday, it’s Red Light Roxy.  Great selection of upbeat jazz, blues, jump, swing and more.

On Sunday, It’s JazzWorks.  Dig into some serious jazz with legends of the Cleveland scene.  It’s a 9 piece group, so it will be rich!

ImageOn Monday, it’s New Year’s Eve!!  We still have some tickets left for Sammy DeLeon’s Latin Jazz Septet on Stephen’s Green Patio.  Both shows for Anne Cochran & Abe LaMarca in the Music Room are sold-out.  Or just join us for dinner in the Lounge, Tiffany Room or The Secret Garden Patio.  Tickets for Sammy, or reservations for dinner are a must for New Year’s Eve.

Then on New Year’s Day, celebrate the new year with a laid back jazz brunch withvocalist Evelyn Wright and pianist David Thomas at Noon.
Happy New Year’s from Nighttown and Jim Wadsworth Productions!

Luna Bakery Offers Holiday Tradition with Fruitcake!

Luna Bakery Offers Holiday Tradition with Fruitcake!

    The beloved (or hated) fruitcake deserves to be part of your holiday traditions, say chefs from Polpetta, Luna Bakery & Cafe and Lucky’s Cafe.  For every person who dismisses this holiday mainstay as a dated cliche relegated to the land of Jello molds and mini-marshmallow salads, there are those who adore fruitcake as a rich, complex indulgence that triggers all sorts of warm memories. “I do like fruitcake,” says Adam Bostwick, co-owner and executive chef of Polpetta. “If you have one made by someone who knows what they are doing, it can be really delicious.” So let’s give fruitcake its due. The recipe dates back as far as 2,000 years ago and has versions in cultures throughout the globe. A common ingredient? Dried fruits and nuts often soaked in alcohol for a very long time. Now who doesn’t love that? “Most of the good ones are started close to a year before they are actually served,” says Bostwick. While the process may be lengthy, a well-made fruitcake disappears quickly around the table. With its chewy interior filled with sweet and layered flavors, fruitcake has established itself as a holiday tradition for centuries past — and centuries to come.
For every person who dismisses this holiday mainstay as a dated cliche relegated to the land of Jello molds and mini-marshmallow salads, there are those who adore fruitcake as a rich, complex indulgence that triggers all sorts of warm memories. “I do like fruitcake,” says Adam Bostwick, co-owner and executive chef of Polpetta. “If you have one made by someone who knows what they are doing, it can be really delicious.” So let’s give fruitcake its due. The recipe dates back as far as 2,000 years ago and has versions in cultures throughout the globe. A common ingredient? Dried fruits and nuts often soaked in alcohol for a very long time. Now who doesn’t love that? “Most of the good ones are started close to a year before they are actually served,” says Bostwick. While the process may be lengthy, a well-made fruitcake disappears quickly around the table. With its chewy interior filled with sweet and layered flavors, fruitcake has established itself as a holiday tradition for centuries past — and centuries to come.   From Cleveland Magazine by Ruth Corradi  Beach, Dec. 20, 2018

R

Story Time

Title: Story Time
Location: 12419 Cedar Road
Link out: Click here
Description: Story Time
Thursday, December 20th, 11 am

Note: this will be the last Story Time of 2018! We will resume on February 7, 2018!

Join Appletree staff and volunteers reading stories for “young sprouts” from our shelves!

No registration necessary; just drop in!

No registration necessary; just drop in! Bring your favorite toddlers and pre-schoolers to our weekly Story Time!

Pick up a Frequent Story Listener Card when you come for storytime –
6 punches = a pick from our book basket!

Interested in becoming a volunteer reader?
Stop in the store, call us at (216) 791-2665, or
email Lorie Novak at lorie@appletree-books.com
Start Time: 11:00 am
Date: 2018-12-20

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